For more than 20 years, we have brainstormed, strategized, and modified our model and compiled much of our findings on this site in an effort to help other churches learn from our experiences.  We will be the first to admit that we are not there yet, but we hope you will find this site helpful as you create environments for people to connect meaningfully with God. Thank you for visiting!

Mission

The Service Programming Division’s mission is to lead people into a growing relationship with Jesus Christ by creating an environment where those attending are led to worship, challenged to connect, and encouraged to embrace the principles and values of God’s Word.  Our goal for the worship service is for the attendee to say, “I want to come back.”

Structure

The Service Programming Division works as a team led by the Service Programming Director to develop the worship services. Our Service Programming Team consists of the following departments:

  • Guest Services
  • Production
  • Programming
  • Media
  • Music

We rely on our team of people who have different personalities and different jobs to brainstorm together to ensure a more comprehensive service. They take the bottom line, the takeaway/creative tension for the series (and for each message), and create an unforgettable experience.

For a more detailed description, please download our SPD Philosophy.

Resources

 

Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is the mission of the Service Programming Division?

Our mission is to lead people into a growing relationship with Jesus Christ by creating an environment where those attending are led to worship, challenged to connect, and encouraged to embrace the principles and values of God’ Word.

2. What is the philosophy of the Service Programming Division?

Read more about our SPD Philosophy.

3. Who oversees the Service Programming Division? Who makes up the staff?

The Service Programming Division works as a team led by the Service Programming Director to develop the worship service.  Our service programming team consists of the following departments:

  • Guest Services
  • Media
  • Music
  • Production
  • Programming

We rely on our team of people with different personalities and different jobs, brainstorming together to ensure a more comprehensive service.  They take the bottom line, the takeaway/creative tension for the series (and for each message), to create an unforgettable experience.  See the SPD Organizational Chart for more information.

4. Why doesn't the music director oversee the service? How does your model differ?

We believe the services are multi-dimensional experiences, encompassing many diverse expressions of worship:  music, art, drama, spoken word, etc. With this in mind, the SPD director should be someone who keeps the big picture in mind at all times and is in tune with what it takes to bring together all elements of the live environment.

5. How do you measure success?

We evaluate our Sunday services on Monday mornings. We are constantly viewing success through the lens of one question: Did we make them want to come back? That is an immediate, if somewhat subjective, measure. Below are a few more objectives measured over time:

  • Are life change and engagement being demonstrated through baptism video testimonies?
  • Is there growth in strategic service (volunteering), groups’ participation, and weekly attendance?
  • Money . . . people give to things that impact them!
  • Is our median age increasing or staying the same?

6. How do you achieve excellence on a limited budget and with fewer resources?

When North Point first started, we didn’t have the resources we do now. Fun doesn’t have to cost money. And something doesn’t have to be expensive to be helpful. But it’s true that money can raise the excellence factor. In the meantime, do things as well as possible!

  • Be creative! Sometimes the simplest thing is the most creative . . . and the least expensive. Use volunteers! Tap into members of your congregation who want to get involved by constantly casting vision for what you want to accomplish.
  • Do any of them have technical talent? If so, leverage it to improve the quality of your services. If not, identify someone who can provide some basic training on how to operate the equipment you do have well.
  • Remove distractions. You’d be surprised how much just paying attention to details helps create excellence (e.g., avoid knee-jerk transitions and typos).